Kitchen

The original kitchen was located in the back of the house with an entrance off the back porch.  It was about 10’x10′ and had 2 windows and 5 doors, making it nearly impossible to find enough wall space to make it work as a modern kitchen.

View from the porch entrance

View from the porch entrance

A nice antique sink

A nice antique sink

View from the dining room door

View from the dining room door

There were two rooms in the kitchen space.  One was a pantry…

Pantry

Pantry

and one was a bathroom.

20140306-DSC_0006

We decided that we wanted to keep the kitchen in the back of the house, but that we would need to get rid of the pantry and relocate the bathroom somewhere else so that we could have a reasonably sized kitchen.  The demo of these two small rooms was our very first project inside the house and we were excited to get going!

Aiden liked the knocking down, but not the cleaning

Aiden liked the demo, but not the cleaning

The kitchen - after day one

The kitchen – after day one

After removing most of the studs

After removing most of the studs

Once we really got going we noticed that the condition of the plaster was pretty rough in the bathroom and kitchen, so we decided to take those down to the studs.

Old pantry and bathroom with plaster removed

Old pantry and bathroom with plaster removed

We soon decided that it would be a good idea to take down all the plaster and lath in the kitchen, just because of all the new plumbing, electrical, and hanging of cabinets that would need to happen.

Gutted kitchen

Gutted kitchen

All plaster, lath, and trim removed!

All the plaster and lath is removed!

There were two doors (one to the old stairs and one to the basement) that were really in the way of designing a practical kitchen.  We were going to build a new staircase, so that door in the kitchen could just be walled off.  The door the basement would need to be moved to the other side so that we could use that wall space for the fridge (or that is what we originally thought).

Door to basement and door to old stairs

Door to basement and door to old stairs

We cut a hole in the wall opposite of that door to create a space for a new door to the basement (that staircase would later be removed).

new entrance to kitchen

new entrance to kitchen

BUT, once we saw what it looked like with a new hallway directly to the kitchen we decided to just keep this area open and have a door to the basement at the top of the stairs instead of blocking this new passageway.  It was one of the best changes we made to our original design and it happened completely by accident.  If we hadn’t done this, it would have meant that all traffic to the kitchen would be routed through the dining room.  Now there is an entrance to the kitchen from the dining room and an additional new hallway that provides more logical access to the downstairs bathroom, playroom, and stairs to the 2nd floor.

Of course this meant additional work.  We needed to remove the stairs, create a new ceiling, raise the floor at the top of the basement steps (so we wouldn’t have to step down and then back up to get into the kitchen), frame out a new door to the basement, and build new stairs to the basement.  Like I said, a lot of additional work, but well worth the effort.

new entrance to kitchen

new entrance to kitchen

raising the floor

raising the floor

New floor at the top of the basement stairs

We used flooring from another location in the house to match the existing floor of the new hallway.

We have always planned on refinishing the kitchen floors, but the original footprint of the old pantry and bathroom left us with some holes in the floor.

20141230-DSC_0016Our solution was to pull up flooring from other areas of the kitchen that we knew would be covered by lower cabinets.

Removing floor that will be under the cabinets

Removing floor that will be under the cabinets

It’s not perfect and it will still be obvious that there used to be a different floor plan, but we kind of like that the floor will retain the history of the house.

No more holes in the floor

No more holes in the floor

The electrical work for the kitchen took Amy a long time to complete.  Besides the normal outlets and power for appliances, we also included 6 recessed lights, 4 pendant lights, and under-cabinet lighting.

Adding cable

Adding cable

Adding recessed lights

Adding recessed lights

Recessed lights

Recessed lights

Before drywall could be installed, we needed to cut furring strips that would bring the wall depth back to where it was with the lath.  If we didn’t do this there would have been a substantial gap between window/door trim and the drywall.

Adding furring strips

Adding furring strips

The walls of the kitchen were insulated with a skim coat of closed-cell spray foam with fiberglass on top.  The roof deck was sprayed with open-cell foam

Insulation on the roof deck

Insulation on the roof deck

Insulation above the kitchen

Insulation above the kitchen

Finally, the big event we have been waiting for…   drywall!

The view from the back door

The view from the back door

The back door

The back door

The two entrances to the kitchen

The two entrances to the kitchen

The taping and mudding cleaned up all the lines and brought us another step closer to paint!

20150411-DSC_003420150411-DSC_0045Once the drywall was complete we could finally re-install the windows.  These were the first windows to be re-installed and the only windows that had the casing removed.  The re-installation included all new spring bronze weather stripping and sash cord.

New sash cord

New sash cord

Spring bronze

Spring bronze

New windows with casing free of staples, nails, and duct tape

New windows with casing free of staples, nails, and duct tape

Windows installed!

Windows installed!

The walls were then primed and the floors were sanded

The kitchen floor didn't give up without a fight

The kitchen floor didn’t give up without a fight

and refinished…

after the first coat of poly

after the first coat of poly

The kitchen floor is definitely a little rough and contains a hodge-podge of wood, patches, and markings from old ovens and linoleum staples, but you can’t say it lacks character!

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