Window Tutorials

When we first toured our house with a couple of experienced rehabbers we were pleased to hear that the windows were in pretty good shape.  I wasn’t sure exactly what that meant at the time, but now I know…  It meant that the wood was not rotted, most of the glass was in tact, and they were in good enough condition to repair rather than replace.  This was good news indeed, because I think windows are one of the top few aspects of a house that define it’s character.  In addition, rehabbing old windows makes good economic sense and is more environmentally responsible.  Old windows, properly renovated, will outlast new windows and provide comparable energy efficiency if paired with appropriate weather stripping and a storm window.

Once I made the decision to renovate the windows myself, I immediately began combing the internet for everything I could find about how to do this.  I found many videos, articles, forums, and blogs that pointed me in the right direction.  In this series of tutorials I will attempt to combine all this information and insert some of my own discoveries.  Keep in mind – I am NOT a professional.  This is my first time doing this and I am just sharing my own experience and what I learned.

You can access each step of the process in the dropdown menu of the main page “Window Restoration Tutorials”

or just click on these:

Step One: How to Remove a Window Sash

Step Two: How to Remove old Glazing

Step Three: How to Repair the Sash for Reglazing

Step Four: How to Reglaze a Window

Step Five: How to Install Spring Bronze Weather Stripping

Step Six: How to Install New Sash Cord

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